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Sint Maarten by WorldsEdge Sint Maarten by WorldsEdge
Saint Martin of Tours was a soldier in the Roman army. As he rode by the city gates, he spied a beggar freezing in the wind. Impulsively, he sliced off half of his own cloak to cover the poor man. Thus he became a symbol of charity throughout Europe

This is an illustration I drew for the cover of the 11/2007 edition of The Crown Prints, and the original was raffled off for the benefit of the CP in 2008.

I was inspired to make a drawing of a mounted Saint Martin by a wooden statue I saw while visiting Brussels (thus the Netherlandish title). It bounced around in my head for a year before I made the image. It is another of my attempts to evoke woodblock printing with pen-and-ink. Lastly, "11 November" is Martinmas, the feast day of Saint Martin of Tours.

I'm thinking I might re-do it because I love it so much and would like to fix some of the problems I see in it.

Publishing history: The Crown Prints November 2007

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:iconoznerol-1516:
This artwork is trully well painted, it is not only evocative of the woodcuts and engravings of old but visually appealing, it even has the anachronistic feel which those painters used while creating their biblical artwork.
The beggar's despair and attrition are also wonderfully depicted.The saint's figure is at the same time imposing and majestic, and as we don't see his gaze he has a sanctity halo. The hands, the movements, the actitude, is almost scenographic, theatrical in both character's and even the horse shares the artwork's soul, embracing and protecting the beggar. The gate's arch acts as a frame, atracting and focusing the viewer on Sain Martin cutting in half his cape for the old and hungry man. Maybe the cutting should be more relevant, and more clear in the artwork's composition, or more detail in the street we see across the gates could be an improvement.

Simple, beauty and a true reminder of the german renaissance artworks.
What do you think?
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3 out of 3 deviants thought this was fair.

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:iconsilhouette01:
Silhouette01 Featured By Owner Nov 11, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
I love the old medieval woodcut feel of this, and hatching you've used to accomplish it is lovely and even throughout - I don't know, somehow I can never do that without getting lazy and messy partway through, but wherever I look on this piece the hatching is neat and straight, so bravo :)

Also, I did not know of St Martin, so I learned something new and interesting there. :D Does the VII on the arch signify anything or is that just a meaningless number?
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:iconworldsedge:
WorldsEdge Featured By Owner Nov 11, 2013  Professional Interface Designer
Hi. Thank you for the great comment. Happy Martinmas, by the way! I'm not particularly religious, but I thought St. Martin had a very interesting story with a great message of charity.

For the inking I used Penstix, and yes, it takes restraint to not get scribbly with the hatchmarks half way through. Thank you for noticing.

The VII stood for the year I made the drawing, 2007... I guess "in story" it is the seventh city gate or something. Mostly meaningless though, and it tends to draw attention, so maybe it wasn't a good idea. :D
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:iconsilhouette01:
Silhouette01 Featured By Owner Nov 19, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks for the info. :)

Nah, I like the VII. I like the original way in which you've incorporated the date into the picture, and if it draws attention I think it does so in a good way - it's a mini story to tell. And besides, 'seventh gate' IS a good in-story explanation. ;)
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:iconidontknowwhoyouknow:
Idontknowwhoyouknow Featured By Owner Nov 10, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Awesome!
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